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Customer Stories: How Aleem will celebrate Eid

Customer Stories: How Aleem will celebrate Eid

Eid al-Fitr, commonly abbreviated to Eid, is one of the most significant religious holidays in the Muslim calendar.

Not only does this day signify the end of Ramadan, it is also a time for celebration and prayer, for spending time with friends and family and enjoying traditional foods.

While Eid can mean many different things to different people, it is often seen as a time for reflection, to spend time with loved ones and to thank Allah for a meaningful and fulfilling Ramadan.

The end of Ramadan

Eid al-Fitr roughly translates as ‘festival of ending the fast’ and can last anywhere from one to three days.

We spoke to Ding customer Aleem from Pakistan and asked him what the significance of Eid is for him.

“Eid means recurring happiness or festivity,” says Aleem.

“It is a thanksgiving day where Muslims assemble in a brotherly and joyful atmosphere to offer their gratitude to Allah for helping them to fulfil their spiritual obligations during Ramadan.”

Occurring after the 30 days of dawn-to-sunset fasting that happens during Ramadan, this holiday celebrates completing the fast as well as sharing time and gifts with loved ones.

“[We mark the occasion by] attending an Eid prayer, celebrating with sweet food and family, giving gifts to kids and sharing gifts with the poor, making their… day.”

A typical Eid

“Muslims wake before dawn [during Eid] and clean their teeth with either a toothbrush or a cleaning twig known as a miswaak,” says Aleem.

“Then they take a bath, get dressed in new clothing or the best clothing they have available and apply perfume.

“Next, they eat a breakfast of dates and other sweets to make clear that they are no longer fasting. Then families travel on foot to the mosque for prayer. They greet other Muslims along the way by saying Eid Mubarak which means happiness to everyone.”

While also celebrating the end of Ramadan, Eid is a time to be thankful and generous. It is very important to Muslims to share with those in need during this time.

A celebration

“Muslim families gather and enjoy the first day of Eid and give gifts. They also eat the first meal of the month.”

For Aleem, as with many Muslims, Eid is a day that is very much anticipated.

“I am looking forward to this holiday for Eidi (gifts), new dress, sweets [such as] sheer khurma, a pudding prepared during Muslim holidays), for meeting with relatives, family and friends and finally, counting my blessings that will be collected on this day.”

Here at Ding, we are working with operators around the world such as Airtel IndiaUfone Pakistan and Etisalat Sri Lanka to ensure that you can get in touch with loved ones during Eid.

From our team at Ding, we would like to wish everyone who celebrates, Eid Mubarak!

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